Decision Making - Shoreline Plan
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Decision Making

TRPA Governing Board Decision Making

 

The recommended policy and code created by this planning process will then go to the Advisory Planning Commission, the Regional Plan Implementation Committee and to the TRPA Governing Board for final approval.

Shoreline Steering Committee Decision Making

 

The Shoreline Steering Committee will strive for consensus among its members. Working toward consensus is a fundamental principle. The definition of consensus spans the range from strong support to neutrality, to abstention, to “I can live with it.” Any of these actions still constitutes consensus. The mediator will document agreements in meeting summaries.

 

If the Shoreline Steering Committee cannot come to 100% agreement, the Committee could set aside the issues while it continues to work on other issues and revisit the disagreement later in the process. The Committee could also form a small subcommittee of 3 members to develop a proposal for full committee consideration. A third option is that the Committee could also write up a summary of the issue, including areas of agreement and disagreement. At least two committee members would then present the issue and outcomes of Steering Committee deliberations to the Regional Plan Implementation Committee (RPIC). The RPIC would consider and make a recommendation on the issue at hand or the next steps to resolve the issue. Once decided upon, staff would incorporate the outcome into the draft policies, codes, and ordinances.

Joint Fact Finding Committee Decision Making

 

The JFF Committee will strive for consensus among its members. Working toward consensus is a fundamental principle. The definition of consensus spans the range from strong support to neutrality, to abstention, to “I can live with it.” Any of these actions still constitutes consensus. The project coordinator and facilitator will document agreements in meeting summaries.

 

If the JFF Committee cannot come to 100% agreement, the Committee will write up a brief summary of the issue, including areas of agreement and disagreement, for the Shoreline Steering Committee to recommend a course of action (which could include sending back to the JFF Committee for further deliberation or making a recommendation on the technical approach). Ultimately, TRPA is responsible for and the final decision-maker on the technical work to support this process. TRPA is committed to collaborating on this effort through the JFF Committee and Shoreline Steering Committee as well as the Shoreline Workshop Series in an effort to achieve consensus and widespread support and understanding for the technical approach.